Military lamp

Selected as an interesting German military piece but who used it?

Military lamp
Case number - PHSL : 182
A 1930s or 1940s portable lantern powered by acetylene and apparently for military use. It is made of compression moulded rag filled phenol formaldehyde and has metal attachments and glass windows.
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DesignerUnknown - Wanted
ManufacturerUnknown - Wanted
CountryGermany
Date1939 (circa)
Dimensionsheight 225 mm, width 100 mm, depth 110 mm
Materialsplastic, bakelite - generic term, PF, Phenol formaldehyde
Methodcompression moulded
Colourbrown
Inscriptionmoulded : "2880 2 small nazi emblem stamped on carrying clip"
href=" http://10most.org.uk/artefact/military-lamp"

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27/05/14

Military lamp PHSL : 182 This object is part of a trial to see if giving specific guidance on research methods makes the game a more successful means of obtaining information about the objects featured. All we know about this is that it is German and made of phenol formaldehyde. But what an interesting object. Perhaps a military historian might be able to tell us about how it was used as well as information about its design and manufacture? Perhaps German museum websites might be a place to start looking? Follow the investigation here: http://10most.org.uk/artefact/military-lamp.

30/05/14

We know this lamp is German because it bears the Nazi symbol but is there anything about its design otherwise that is different from English military lamps?

03/06/14

Described as a WWII German bakelite carbide signal lantern. Manufacturer marked and dated 1945. See - http://www.ebay.com/itm/290978498547 The round carbide container, which also serves as the lantern's base, should be filled with small lumps of dust-free carbide up to the level of the three flanges on the inside. Then the perforated pressure cover, which is equipped with a spiral spring, is put on (with the spring turned upward). On this spring there is fitted a funnel with a little perforated tube, which points downward. After these preparations, the filled carbide container is screwed firmly into the lantern. It is important to make certain that the rubber washer is in place. If, after long use, the threads on the carbide container become dry, they should be greased lightly. The setscrew with a drip needle in the center of the zinc water container must be screwed down firmly. The slotted screw cap at one side of the water container is then unscrewed, the water container is filled to the top, and the screw cap is replaced. The setscrew is given a single turn to the left. Gas is produced by the water dripping into the carbide container. This gas seeps evenly through the burner. The flame should be about 1/3 inch high, and should burn/without hissing. If necessary, the setscrew to the water intake should be regulated. One filling of water will allow the lantern to burn for at least 8 hours if the above directions are followed carefully. After use, the parts which have come into contact with carbide must be cleaned. If this is not done, the life and intensity of the flame will be reduced. This description of use from - http://www.crazyoz.com/ad_71709.html

03/06/14

This lantern seems to have been made by the German company Zeiler who made other lanterns and lamps for the third Reich. See some very detailed pictures of this lantern in its original casing plus the Zeiller mark at - http://www.warrelics.eu/forum/field-equipment-accessories-3-reich/german-bakelite-lantern-28483-3/

03/06/14

NOTE - This is a signal lantern, not a railway signal lantern. The railway lanterns were a very similar design but made of metal.

09/06/14

Many thanks for this, Ian. Fascinating stuff. But have you found evidence of Zeiler making phenol formaldehyde lamps as well as metal ones? Do you think we should take a closer look at the PHS's example - unscrew it if it unscrews easily?

09/06/14

perhaps there is someone who knows more about the company, Zeiler, or indeed similar companies, who can provide further information?

09/06/14

Sue. To find the Zeiler Bakelite lanterns you have to scroll down a bit through the war relics site to get to the boxed set. Which looks like this -

09/06/14

The component part that is second from right on the bottom row of this boxed set is marked Zeiler. Both photos from -http://www.warrelics.eu/forum/field-equipment-accessories-third-reich/german-bakelite-lantern-28483-3/#post1098957

19/06/14

Thank you for that Ian - we must take a closer look at the actual object but from the relatively detailed photographs we have it doesn't seem that the one in the collection has this lettering....

20/06/14

The lanterns don't have Zeiler moulded onto them. Just this component in the boxed set.

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Case notes

Susan Lambert's picture

Military lamp: Case PHSL : 182

This object is part of a trial to see if giving specific guidance on research methods makes the game a more successful means of obtaining information about the objects featured.

What an interesting object.  Perhaps a military historian might be able to tell us about how it was used as well as information about its design and manufacture? Perhaps German museum websites might be a plce to start looking?

Carbide signal lantern probably made by the German company, Zeiler

Chief Agent Holdsworth has found a wonderful amount of material about this type of lamp including how it worked. You can read about that in this link:http://www.crazyoz.com/ad_71709.html and also in the Evidence locker.

He has also found detailed images of similar lamps that suggest that it was made by the German company, Zeiller but  is there any proof that it made phenol formaldehyde lamps as well as metal ones?

Ideally we would have additional evidence to support the supposition that this lamp was designed by Zeiler and there must have been an individual who came up with such a classic design.

Proof that the manufacturer was Zeiler

20/06/14

Chief Agent Holdsworth has done it again. He has found a boxed set and another component in the set is marked Zeiler. That is sufficient evidence. Take a look at these images.

But we are still looking for who worked at/for Zeiler and came up with the design.